Benjamin Netanyahu and Benny Gantz agreed to a rotation government, with Netanyahu as leader for the first 18 months-Zamkuwire - Zamkuwire.com

Benjamin Netanyahu and Benny Gantz agreed to a rotation government, with Netanyahu as leader for the first 18 months-Zamkuwire

0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 44 Second

The Knesset plenum, June 27, 2022

Benjamin Netanyahu and Benny Gantz agreed to a rotation government, with Netanyahu as leader for the first 18 months, then Gantz taking over.

The bill approving the new government – led by the leader of the right-wing Likud party Netanyahu – was given first approval on April 30, and, on May 6, the coalition agreement was approved by the Supreme court.

Netanyahu and the new government were sworn in on May 17.

In August, normalization between Israel and the United Arab Emirates was announced, with agreements between Bahrain and Israel following the month after.

Also in September, the Knesset authorized a “special coronavirus emergency,” continuing to limit public gatherings. The law was criticized for limiting demonstrations against Netanyahu over alleged corruption.

The deadline to pass the budget for 2020 was approaching, and Israeli law stipulates that if a state budget is not passed, the Knesset dissolves.

Likud held up the budget for months, attempting to renegotiate a more favorable coalition agreement. The right-wing party and the center Blue and White party blamed each other for being unable to pass the budget.

“The election can still be prevented by the person who is causing it,” Blue and White leader Benny Gantz said, referring to Netanyahu, according to The Jerusalem Post.

The Knesset rejected a bill to delay the deadline, setting Israel on an almost-certain course for the next round of elections. Several defectors from inside the Blue and White party voted against the measure, as did one Likud member.

If the bill passed, it would have delayed the deadline to pass the 2020 budget from December 23 to December 31.

“If there were not a trial, there would be a budget and there would not be elections,” the Blue and White party said in a statement, The Times of Israel reported.

The Knesset failed to approve the 2020 state budget by the required deadline, and, on December 23, 2020, the government collapsed, and the 23rd Knesset was officially dissolved.

Netanyahu insisted he did everything to prevent the fourth round of elections, saying, “I didn’t want elections. Likud didn’t want elections. We voted again and again against elections.”

March 2021

On March 23, 2021, Israel held its fourth round of elections.

Likud pulled ahead, winning 30 seats. Centrist Yesh Atid, – led by former journalist Yair Lapid – came in second, with 17 seats.

Netanyahu was once again charged with forming a government, given until May 4 to do so. The former prime minister failed to form a new administration by the deadline.

The next day, Rivlin gave the mandate to Lapid, who turned to the leader of the right-wing Yamina party, Naftali Bennett, to form a coalition.

In late May, Lapid secured support from Blue and White, the center-left Labor Party, Yisrael Beiteinu, center-right New Hope, and left-wing Meretz, with Yamina and Islamist Ra’am possibly giving support.

On May 30, Bennett announced that Yamina would join a unity government with Lapid, after all but one Yamina lawmaker agreed to back his decision.

Shortly after, Ra’am leader Mansour Abbas signed a coalition agreement with Lapid and agreed to allow his party to join a government.

This was the first time in Israel’s history an Arab party joined a governing coalition.

Just one hour before the June 2 mandate was set to expire, Lapid informed Rivlin that he could form a new government.

On June 13, the new government was sworn in, with Bennett as prime minister and Lapid as alternate prime minister, intended to take over as premier in August of 2023. The coalition held just 61 seats, giving it a slight majority over the opposition.

The broad unity government faced trouble from the start.

The outgoing Knesset Speaker, Yariv Levin – of Likud – indicated that he would attempt to delay the investiture vote as long as he could. Levin was ultimately replaced by Mickey Levy of Yesh Atid, and the government was sworn in – by a margin of 60 to 59 with one abstention.

One Yamina member voted against the government being sworn in, Amichai Chikli.

Chikli voted against his party a total of 754 times, regularly assisting the opposition, resulting in him being officially censured as a defector.

In November 2021, the coalition passed the first budget in over three years. But trouble was still around the corner.

Less than a year after the new government was sworn in, Yamina lawmaker Idit Silman announced her withdrawal from the coalition, leaving the fragile coalition without a majority.

Not long after, Meretz lawmaker Ghaida Rinawie Zoabi announced her departure from the coalition but reversed her decision shortly after. On June 13, Yamina member Nir Orbach left the coalition.

Alongside the various departures, it was time to renew the law extending Israeli civil law to settlers in the West Bank. Passed shortly after the Six Day War, the regulations have never lapsed, and need to be renewed every five years.

Despite ideologically agreeing with the bill, the opposition refused to support it when it came time to vote, not wanting to give the coalition a win.

The bill was supported by 52 Knesset members and opposed by 58 – including two coalition members and failed the June 7 vote.

Afraid of Israel descending into chaos, there was one way out: dissolve the Knesset.

The only way to extend the regulations without a majority in the Knesset was to dissolve the government before the regulations lapsed, resulting in an automatic extension of the bill.

Israel’s opposition was also working on creating an alternative government, most likely led by Netanyahu.

Instead of waiting for the opposition to dissolve the government, Bennett and Lapid chose to do it themselves.

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: